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This first day of classes eclipses all others

Faculty, staff and students in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences took time to gather outside and watch the total eclipse. A light cloud cover blocked the view of the sun from periodically but it cleared in time to experience the full eclipse.

Two veterinary students sit on the sidewalk to watch the eclipse.
Veterinary students gather in the courtyard outside the Nebraska Veterinary Diagnostic Center to watch the total eclipse.
SVMBS faculty and staff watch the eclipse progress.
Veterinary students watch the eclipse from the courtyard of the Nebraska Veterinary Diagnostic Center.
A group of veterinary students watch the eclipse on the sidewalk outside the Nebraska Veterinary Diagnostic Center.








Aug. 21 Seminar: Mysteries of the inflamed heart

Photo of Daniela Cihakova

Daniela Cihakova, associate professor at Johns Hopkins University, will present "Mysteries of the inflamed heart,” Aug. 21 in VBS 145 at 4 p.m.









Sollars is new director of undergrad education programs

Gov Rathnaiah is presented with a computer bag, by his adviser Raul Barletta and director of the School Clayton Kelling.

Patricia Sollars, associate professor of neuroscience in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, became the new director of University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Undergraduate Education Programs on Aug. 14. In her new role, Dr. Sollars will oversee the Achievement-Centered General Education Program, undergraduate curriculum and assessment processes, transfer credit processes, academic learning communities, bulletin polices and processes and is on advisory committees related to undergraduate student success.

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Govardhan Rathnaiah earns doctorate

Gov Rathnaiah is presented with a computer bag, by his adviser Raul Barletta and director of the School Clayton Kelling.
Dr. Raul Barletta (left) and Dr. Clayton Kelling (right) present Govardhan Rathnaiah with a gift from SVMBS.

Govardhan Rathnaiah, student of Dr. Raul Barletta, received his Ph.D. on Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017, at the Pinnacle Bank Arena. Gov successfully completed his thesis titled, “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis." Gov has plans to further his research career as a post-doctoral candidate.



Professor Emeritus Dee Griffin Honored by Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame

Dee Griffin and family
Dee Griffin, joined by his family, was honored with the Industry Leadership Award from the Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame.

Dee Griffin, veterinarian and professor emeritus in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln was presented the Industry Leadership Award and inducted into the Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame at the group’s annual banquet held July 11, 2017, in Denver, CO.

The national award recognizes distinguished individuals who have demonstrated outstanding leadership, provided exemplary service and have made significant contributions to the advancement of the cattle-feeding industry.

Griffin has been a leader in beef-cattle medicine and beef production systems for over 40 years. He is widely recognized in the beef industry for helping to establish the nationally known Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program, a set of management practices and husbandry techniques that help improve herd health and ensure that consumers are provided a safe, high quality product.

BQA was developed to help beef producers improve certain production practices as well as reduce occurrences of drug residues in consumer products, a significant problem for the beef industry in the 1980s and 1990s. Through BQA, Griffin educates producers and veterinarians about antibiotic uses, dosages, extra-label use and withdrawal times. As a result, incidents of drug residue declined and are rarely found today. BQA is a nationally coordinated, state implemented program that has expanded to include management practices related to record keeping and protecting herd health.

Raised on a cow-calf operation in western Oklahoma, Griffin became engaged in beef production early on. He earned his veterinary degree at Oklahoma State University in 1976 and a master’s degree in pathology and ruminant nutrition from Purdue University in 1978. Griffin was a university faculty member at the Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center (GPVEC) for 25 years. He retired from the university in 2016. Griffin is currently a clinical professor and director of the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Center.



Susan Ann Smith Mills Memorial Award granted to two grad students

Rakesh Basavalingappa
Rakesh Basavalingappa
Bharathi Krishnan Yalaka
Bharathi Krishnan Yalaka

 SVMBS graduate students Bharathi Krishnan Yalaka and Rakesh Basavalingappa are the recipients of the 2017 Susan Ann Smith Mills Memorial Award.

The award recognizes outstanding graduate students conducting research in the biomedical science area and is based on accomplishments and research credentials.

Basavalingappa's research focuses on identifying the immunogenic epitopes of putative cardiac antigens like adenine nucleotide translocator 1, and β-adrenergic receptor 1, which have been implicated in the immune pathogenesis of CVB3 infection.Krishnan's specialization is immunology, molecular biology, proteins and in vivo disease models in mice. Basavalingappa and Krishnan are graduate students of Dr. Jay Reddy.

The Susan Ann Smith Mills Fund was established in 1987 by her uncle and aunt to commemorate her life and dedication to research. Susan Mills worked in the Veterinary Diagnostic Center and in research areas within the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Susan earned a Master of Science through the department.



New equipment at VDC speeds response to animal diseases

Kara Robbins and Dustin Loy discuss bacteria samples tested in new equipment at the VDC
Kara Robbins and Dustin Loy discuss bacteria samples tested in new equipment at the VDC

New equipment is allowing researchers at the Nebraska Veterinary Diagnostic Center to identify potentially deadly bacteria in a matter of minutes — a process that previously took days.

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