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Milton E. Mohr scholarships awarded

Arun Saravana Kumar Annamalai, graduate reearch assistant poses outside the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences building.
Arun Saravana Kumar Annamalai
Caitlyn A. Deal, a junior majoring in Animal Science, poses outside the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences building.
Caitlyn A. Deal

The Center for Biotechnology has announced the recipients for the Milton E. Mohr Scholarship and Fellowship.

Graduate Research Assistant, Arun Saravana Kumar Annamalai has been awarded the Milton E. Mohr Fellowship in the amount of $1,000 for the 2018-2019 academic year.

Undergraduate Caitlyn A. Deal, a junior in Animal Science has been awarded the Milton E. Mohr Scholarship in the amount of $1,000 for the 2018-2019 academic year.

The Milton E. Mohr Awards Program recognizes outstanding students in the sciences of biotechnology and engineering based on their academic performance and potential for accomplishments in their specific field. The Milton E. Mohr Scholarship and Fellowship Awards Program was established in 1989 for students in the College of Engineering or Biotechnology degree programs. The scholarships and fellowships are made possible through an endowment to the University Foundation.

 

Grotelueschen named veterinarian of the year

Veterinarian of the Year Dr. Dale Grotelueschen with his wife Liza and family members
Veterinarian of the Year Dr. Dale Grotelueschen with his wife Liza and family members at the Nebraska Veterinary Medical Association annual conference. Photo by NVMA

Dr. Dale Grotelueschen, director of the Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center and professor in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, was named Veterinarian of the Year by the Nebraska Veterinary Medical Association (NVMA). Dr. Grotelueschen accepted the award at the NVMA annual conference held in Omaha Jan. 25, 2018.

Veterinarian of the Year is awarded to an NVMA member who has contributed to the advancement of veterinary medicine in Nebraska, has had special accomplishments to the profession recognized and has provided service to the NVMA, the profession and their community.

 

Doster honored with Distinguished Service Award

Dr. Alan Doster receives Distinguished Service Award from colleague Dr. Bruce Brodersen.
Dr. Alan Doster was presented with the NVMA Distinguished Service Award by colleague Dr. Bruce Brodersen. Photo by NVMA

Dr. Alan Doster received the Distinguished Service Award from the Nebraska Veterinary Medical Association (NVMA) at its annual conference held in Omaha Jan. 25, 2018. Dr. Doster is a veterinarian, director of the Nebraska Veterinary Diagnostic Center and professor in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

The Distinguished Service Award recognizes an individual who has contributed outstanding service to the advancement of veterinary medicine in all aspects of the profession.

 


 

Gentry Lewis receives OEA award

Patricia Neben (left), Catia Guerrero, Gentry Lewis and Bob Hendrickson receive their awards from IANR Associate Vice Chancellor Ron Yoder and IANR Harlan Vice Chancellor Mike Boehm
IANR Outstanding Employee Award winners Patricia Neben (left), Catia Guerrero, Gentry Lewis and Bob Hendrickson receive their awards from IANR Harlan Vice Chancellor Mike Boehm. Photo by Craig Chandler / University Communications

Gentry Lewis, laboratory manager in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, received an IANR 2017 Outstanding Employee Award at a luncheon in the Nebraska East Union on Dec. 1, 2017.

The award recognizes individuals who go above and beyond their job responsibilities and demonstrate an excellent work ethic, produce high quality work and have an extraordinary impact within their department.

Gentry has been lab manager for Dr. Rodney Moxley since 2009. She supervises technicians, teaches graduate and undergraduate students laboratory techniques and methods, and “displays an outstanding level of knowledge, technical expertise, intellect and experience,” according to a nomination letter. Another nominator noted that Gentry can be counted on to find the answer to questions “whether it is regarding the operations of the lab, personnel issues, maintenance issues, unknown bills, or vending machines.” It also was noted that Gentry is "kind, courteous, thoughtful and professional, and displays 'common sense.' She has also demonstrated patience and grace in dealing with other employees and graduate students."

OEA recipients receive a cash award and certificate. Congratulations on this well-deserved award, Gentry!

 


 

 

USDA award recognizes E. coli research at Nebraska

A Nebraska researcher transfers <em>E.coli</em> from gar plates growing cultures for analysis.
A Nebraska researcher transfers E.coli from gar plates growing cultures for analysis.

A seven-year national research project led by Nebraska scientists received the Partnership Award from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, the research arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP) on E. coli was recognized for efforts to reduce food-borne illness caused by Shiga toxin-producing E. coli. The award, in the mission integration category, honors the E. coli project for integrating research, education and extension for the benefit of agriculture, the environment, communities or people. Dr. Rodney Moxley, Charles Bessey Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences serves as the project director. Read more.

Mutation discovery offers clues to why Zika became more dangerous

Asit K. Pattnaik looks over samples with Bikash R. Sahoo and Arun S. Annamalai. In the background are teammates Aryamav Pattnaik, Hiep Vu, and Shi-hua Xiang.
Dr. Asit K. Pattnaik looks over samples with Bikash R. Sahoo and Arun S. Annamalai. In the background are teammates Aryamav Pattnaik, Hiep Vu, and Shi-hua Xiang.

Dr. Asit Pattnaik, virologist in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, and his teammates have identified a Zika mutation that may help explain why the virus became more lethal during outbreaks that sickened tens of thousands of people in the Caribbean, South America and the United States in 2015 and 2016. Read more.

Richard Randle recognized for contributions to Livestock Birthing Pavilion

Dr. Richard Randle (center) accepts a plaque from Nebraska State Fair Board Member Bill Angel (left) for his contributions to the success of the Livestock Birthing Pavilion. Dr. Melissa Girard-Lemons (right) oversees the NVMA volunteers.
Dr. Richard Randle (center) accepts a plaque from Nebraska State Fair Board Member Bill Angel (left) for his contributions to the success of the Livestock Birthing Pavilion. Dr. Melissa Girard-Lemons (right) oversees the NVMA volunteers, who provide veterinary care to the animals.

Richard Randle, veterinarian and associate professor in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (SVMBS), was recognized by Nebraska State Fair Board for six years of service managing the Livestock Birthing Pavilion at the Nebraska State Fair. The birthing pavilion provides the opportunity for visitors to witness animal births during the course of the two-week fair. Piglets, dairy and beef calves, ewes and chicks are born under the supervision of veterinarians and other trained professionals from SVMBS and the Nebraska Veterinary Medical Association.

This was Dr. Randle's last year managing the Birthing Pavilion; he will retire this fall.

Dr. Randle joined the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences in 2007 as the extension beef cattle veterinarian. He specializes in beef cow/calf production management, and his research interests include young stock management, disease monitoring and quality assurance.

Read more about the Livestock Birthing Pavilion:
Live Births Draw Big Crowds at Birthing Pavilion — Grand Island Independent

New equipment at VDC speeds response to animal diseases

Kara Robbins and Dustin Loy discuss bacteria samples tested in new equipment at the VDC
Kara Robbins and Dustin Loy discuss bacteria samples tested in new equipment at the VDC

New equipment is allowing researchers at the Nebraska Veterinary Diagnostic Center to identify potentially deadly bacteria in a matter of minutes — a process that previously took days.

Read more