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Emerging Technologies in Veterinary Diagnostic Microbiology

Dustin Loy

J. Dustin Loy, assistant professor in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, will present "Emerging Technologies in Veterinary Diagnostic Microbiology: Applications to Bovine Respiratory and Ocular Diseases" Sept. 18 at 4 p.m. in VBS 145.

Abstract

Bovine respiratory and ocular diseases are some of the most significant and costly challenges in beef production in Nebraska and throughout the U.S. Economic costs exceed more than $1 billion dollars and cause significant animal health and welfare impacts. Both diseases are complex with multiple viral and bacterial etiologies and significant gaps exist in understanding the underlying pathogen ecology and causal mechanisms. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in several pathogens enhances the need to develop more effective prevention and treatment strategies. Studies applying emerging technologies such as proteomics using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, next generation sequencing for bacterial genomics and highly multiplexed real time PCR tools have been used in large and diverse pathogen collections to further understand and enhance diagnosis of these costly and complex multi-factorial diseases of cattle production.

Richard Randle recognized for contributions to Livestock Birthing Pavilion

Dr. Richard Randle (center) accepts a plaque from Nebraska State Fair Board Member Bill Angel (left) for his contributions to the success of the Livestock Birthing Pavilion. Dr. Melissa Girard-Lemons (right) oversees the NVMA volunteers.
Dr. Richard Randle (center) accepts a plaque from Nebraska State Fair Board Member Bill Angel (left) for his contributions to the success of the Livestock Birthing Pavilion. Dr. Melissa Girard-Lemons (right) oversees the NVMA volunteers, who provide veterinary care to the animals.

Richard Randle, veterinarian and associate professor in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (SVMBS), was recognized by Nebraska State Fair Board for six years of service managing the Livestock Birthing Pavilion at the Nebraska State Fair. The birthing pavilion provides the opportunity for visitors to witness animal births during the course of the two-week fair. Piglets, dairy and beef calves, ewes and chicks are born under the supervision of veterinarians and other trained professionals from SVMBS and the Nebraska Veterinary Medical Association.

This was Dr. Randle's last year managing the Birthing Pavilion; he will retire this fall.

Dr. Randle joined the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences in 2007 as the extension beef cattle veterinarian. He specializes in beef cow/calf production management, and his research interests include young stock management, disease monitoring and quality assurance.

Read more about the Livestock Birthing Pavilion:
Live Births Draw Big Crowds at Birthing Pavilion — Grand Island Independent



New equipment at VDC speeds response to animal diseases

Kara Robbins and Dustin Loy discuss bacteria samples tested in new equipment at the VDC
Kara Robbins and Dustin Loy discuss bacteria samples tested in new equipment at the VDC

New equipment is allowing researchers at the Nebraska Veterinary Diagnostic Center to identify potentially deadly bacteria in a matter of minutes — a process that previously took days.

Read more